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Bruce Mcburney

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McBurney Cracks Super-Carburetor Code


Inventor J. Bruce McBurney says the key to super carburetors is the catalytic cracking of the larger gasoline molecules into the dynamic combusting single-carbon molecules of methane and methanol, in the presence of heat, a catalyst, and water vapor.

ONTARIO, CANADA (PRWEB) November 17 2003--Everyone has heard of super efficient carburetors being invented and then suppressed. Few understand the underlying technology as well as J. Bruce McBurney does.

"Today's engines should run 4-5 times more efficiently than they do -- with virtually no pollution to the environment," says McBurney.

He says the key to gasoline efficiency is found in 'cracking' the fuel from the large-molecule octane into small molecule methanol and natural gas. This yields far more 'dynamic' explosions than 'heat' energy in the piston.

"Most people who tinker with increasing the efficiency of carburetor systems think that it is the vaporizing of the fuel that is the primary cause of the increased efficiency." Actually, following a basic law of physics, the vapor is quickly turned back to liquid by its compression in the piston. "The methanol and natural gas that are created while the fuel is vaporized are what result in the increased efficiency."

According to McBurney, the process is really quite simple. You vaporize the fuel through any of a number of methods, then in the presence of heat generated from the exhaust, and added water vapor, run the fuel-water mixture across a catalyzing agent, and a vast portion of the fuel molecules will break down into methanol and natural gas. The heat and catalyst and water drive the reaction.

Gallon for gallon, natural gas and methanol burn approximately as efficiently as gasoline. The efficiency of McBurney's system comes because by using this process of 'cracking' the fuel, one gallon of gas with two gallons of water will produce four to five Gallons of natural gas and methanol. These smaller molecules occupy a greater amount of space.

"The chemistry is straightforward, and proven," says McBurney. He verified this process at Brock University in Ontario using UV spectrum analysis and gas chromatography.

The boiling point of gasoline is in the range of 130 to 430 degrees Fahrenheit. In any given gasoline solution some molecules will boil at a lower temperature, while others boil at a higher temperature. It is a function of the chemical chain, whether it is a C-6 or up to a C-12, and each of these has a 3-D pattern that effects its boiling point, so there is an infinite variety of temperatures involved within that range.
McBurney then points out that by converting all these larger molecules of an infinite number of boiling points into mostly single-carbon molecules -- methanol and methane -- the boiling points are greatly lowered, and they come within the same temperature range, so their ignition in the piston is virtually instantaneous, giving a much greater percussion. Both the lowering of the boiling point and the synchronizing of the boiling point are what give these systems their drastically increased efficiency. It's like soldiers marching lock-step across a bridge and bringing it down.

He claims the oil industry has known of this phenomenon for decades, and has purposely thwarted this effect by its additives, especially lead, which have the effect of inhibiting this catalytic cracking process. Even "unleaded" gas includes a form of lead, according to the MSDA spec sheets that the fuel companies are required to produce.

"I don't think it is mere coincidence that the oil companies began adding lead to their gas in the 1930's after the emergence of the Pogue carburetor." Lead inhibits the catalytic property of the Pogue, rendering it nearly useless after just a short while of running.

Another additive that inhibits the catalytic cracking is an "anti pyrosis agent" that is purported to "block the natural decomposition of organic matter, so the fuel stays fresh in fuel tanks."

McBurney points out that gasoline is "organic matter," and claims that the catalytic cracking process is what the oil companies are primarily aiming to inhibit.

"Many who experiment with fuel vaporizing methods are puzzled as to why their system works well at first, but then diminishes in performance. Whatever metal is serving as the catalyst to crack to fuel is becoming caked with the additives."

McBurney proposes three different methods to overcome the additive obstacle. Gasoline obtained from the well head, straight from the refiners, before the additives are introduced, is an obvious but not readily available solution. Another alternative is to run the fuel through an activated coconut charcoal that removes the additives before vaporization. The third alternative is to increase the catalyst area a thousand times that of the Pogue, by using a bed of metal filings.

McBurney cites several substances that function as a catalyzing agent for cracking, including nickel, platinum, steel, aircraft aluminum. He used metal shavings because of the increased surface area.

After having a patent ready to file in Canada, McBurney was impeded by a change of filing protocol midstream, leading to a violation that would have been irrelevant under the previous rules. Lacking the funds to take the case to the Canadian Supreme Court, he chose instead to publish his design openly. His booklet, The Secret Super High Mileage Report, includes the patent, with drawings and explanation. He has money-back guarantee if the reader is not convinced, and has sold 1600 books with only two refunds thus far. The text is available for free on his website HIMACResearch.com

The problem with his design is that it is expensive and complex to build. It is not something someone could simply pull together in their back yard using off-the-shelf components and fit under the hood. Only mass production would render it cost effective. Better yet, the most obvious place for its integration would be into the overall design of the engine by the automobile manufacturers.
For Now . . .
Meanwhile, the most cost-effective and easy to install system McBurney recommends is the "Condensator," which retails at around $100.00. "It increases gas mileage a little, but cuts down on pollution a lot." "The older the car, the better the gas mileage improvement will be," he says. "It just hooks up in series with the hose coming from the PVC valve under the carburetor."

He recommends to be sure to empty out the canister when it reaches half full, and clean out the catalyst unit with every oil change.

For those who are only slightly mechanically inclined, he recommends the Hydrogen Boost system, and provides a manual for sale on his site that has full instructions on how to build one. It does not require welding or machine work, but just simple electrical and plumbing hook-up. It is an electrolysis unit that hooks up to the car battery. The package also includes basic plans for a home made version of the condensator.

For those who are much more mechanically inclined, he recommends the latest HIMAC publication on a CD: The APOD Fuel System, by Anthony P. O' Donnel from Australia. It comes with interactive Auto CAD 2000 drawings and complete collection of notes, testimonials, pictures, and text to help you build your own system to triple your gas mileage. More CDs are also in the works.
Like the light bulb manufacturers who purposely design a limited lifetime for their product so they can get the return business of a replacement, "the automobile manufacturers have a vested interest in inefficient carburetors, both in terms of service calls from engine wear, and in replacements," not to mention whatever collusion they have behind closed doors with the oil companies.

Efficiency means cooler running, and cooler running means longer life and less maintenance.

Until such technology is finally adopted by the automobile manufacturers, "the biggest factor that would open up this technology would be to make non-additive gasoline readily available," says McBurney. Either of those eventualities are dependent on enough people putting pressure on the oil industry and automobile industry.

In 1987 McBurney converted a '76 Dodge minivan to his design, and it got 70 mpg "when it was working well." He said the carburetor system will have to be computer controlled to handle the intricate system. "It's like an onboard oil refinery."

In similar designs, the radiator never gets hotter than lukewarm, because the fuel was being burned so efficiently. McBurney's design calls for a computer to be programmed to jettison a stream of normal fuel for initial warm up and for high acceleration so that the car will have adequate power, but that otherwise the fuel will run through the catalytic cracking unit.

Considering the wide range of boiling points of gasoline, McBurney explains why some high-efficiency carburetor claims can be misleading. "The acidic additives are catalyzing the release of a certain range of molecules in the gasoline mixture, giving an initial positive result, but then the remaining molecules are yet in solution, and the complete burn of the entire gasoline solution may not be that much more efficient." A test to ferret out this effect would be use up the whole tank of gas (however full it is) and then check the mileage.

McBurney also states that one of the factors that most carburetor efficiency enthusiasts do not realize is the importance of water in the equation. "That is why these vaporizer systems run more efficiently in humid conditions," he said. McBurney sets forth the chemical equation of the reaction, and shows that there are two water molecules called for every one molecule of gasoline, to yield C1H4 (methane/natural gas) and C1OH3 (methanol).

A contention that McBurney hears frequently when he states that methanol and natural gas are produced in the cracking of the gasoline, is that natural gas cars don't have any power. His response is that the vehicles on the market lack an accelerator (pump)/circuit. The National Hot Rodder's Association have race cars that use natural gas with an accelerator pump, and they get plenty of horse power.

One has to wonder why such a solution would not be implemented immediately into the mainstream market, if was so simple.

"It's not chemistry, it's politics," is what E.A. Cherniak, late Head of the Chemistry Department at Brock University in Ontario of told McBurney after receiving a phone call that turned him pale and scared him away from helping McBurney in 1987. Two years later he agreed to at least pen some kind of statement of endorsement, "but it is nothing compared to what he knew" laments McBurney. Professor Cherniak only went so far as to say, "The concepts of Mr. McBurney are scientifically and technologically sound."

Once at an automobile show, where McBurney was passing out business cards with a little blurb about the carburetor system, he ran into a fellow who said, "You only get 100 mpg? I get 140." They spoke at length, and when McBurney asked him why he doesn't try to do something with his technology, the man responded, looking down at his five-year-old son, that he does not want to go to jail.

McBurney tells a story of another man he met named Stanley Meyers, who said he could run a car on water, and finally got a grant for 50 million dollars to develop it, held a celebration with his colleagues at a restaurant, stood up and said, "I've been poisoned," then went out to the parking lot and keeled over dead. Meanwhile, a van had pulled up to his shop, and men wearing black carted off with his stuff. Later, someone sent McBurney a copy of all of Meyers' notes. "I didn't understand them, but I made copies of them and gave them to a lot of people. They're posted on Keeley.Net."

Threats and opposition do not stop McBurney. He has lost his wife over this, and his family has been broken up. Yet he continues to hope that some day something will happen to finally allow this technology to break into the mainstream.

Stories like this sound like so much science fiction, yet in the many time he has presented this information to an audience of at least 50, McBurney has inevitably found another person who knows someone personally who has had a super-oppression experience of some kind or another when they had developed a super efficient technology.

McBurney has tried to get on Art Bell's Coast to Coast program, but was declined by the manager who said, "Everyone knows that high efficiency carburetors are suppressed; that is not news." Yet the show regularly airs other topics that are suppressed such as UFOs, alternative healing modalities, and supernatural phenomenon. Art Bell himself responded by saying that he was not convinced there was anything to the claim, and until he rode 200 miles he would not do a show on it. Yet he regularly airs claims about other subjects of which he has no direct experience. "Perhaps I just need to find the right connection," McBurney says.

He is not lacking in his ability to express himself clearly and convincingly. "I can explain it so your mother-in-law and understand it." His presence on the phone was amiable and patient.

He also has approached Green Peace and other environmentalist groups, because of the great boon this technology would be to the environment. He offered to turn all the rights to the technology over to them so that their bylaws would not have conflict in endorsing a particular company. They likewise turned him down, saying, "We get one call a week from someone claiming they have a super-efficient carburetor," as if that was evidence that none exist.

"Not only are automobiles polluting the environment, but they are gobbling up all the oxygen on the planet," says McBurney, citing the volume of oxygen consumed by an automobile while running. Scientists have documented a distinct drop in the amount of oxygen in the air we breath over the past decades. A lack of oxygen has also been shown to be directly responsible for the increase in the incidence of cancer. That motivates McBurney perhaps more than the pollution to the environment and the consumption of non-renewable fuels. Cancer is now killing nearly one of every two people.

"I'll talk to anyone who will listen," McBurney says, whether or not they're a journalist, whether or not they're going to go build something. "I just want this technology to get out there."

He describes a metaphor. "It's like you're walking along the street and you see men raping a young girl. Do you walk on and not get involved, or do you try to do something about it? The young girl is the environment, and the men raping her are the oil interests."

"I'm doing this for my children and for the future of this planet," he says. "I don't care if I don't get a penny from it. I'll give it away. I just want to see this technology put into use."

His booklets and other information might not have the professional looking polish that is found in mainstream technologies, but it is a catalyst that can make all the difference -- if we can get the lead out.

p.s. Pass it on!!



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Average Rating: 4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars

Reviewer: sdenne - 3.00 out of 5 stars3.00 out of 5 stars3.00 out of 5 stars - April 3, 2011
Subject: McBurney cracks gas
Nice presentation of Suppressed Technology. There is more information about this on Google "Suppressed Inventions."

Another presentation on gas cracking would be nice.

PEA RESEARCH, IAeSR.
Reviewer: top_gun_toronto - 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars - March 30, 2006
Subject: not a review...content description
McBurney Cracks Super-Carburetor Code


Inventor J. Bruce McBurney says the key to super carburetors is the catalytic cracking of the larger gasoline molecules into the dynamic combusting single-carbon molecules of methane and methanol, in the presence of heat, a catalyst, and water vapor.

ONTARIO, CANADA (PRWEB) November 17 2003--Everyone has heard of super efficient carburetors being invented and then suppressed. Few understand the underlying technology as well as J. Bruce McBurney does.

"Today's engines should run 4-5 times more efficiently than they do -- with virtually no pollution to the environment," says McBurney.

He says the key to gasoline efficiency is found in 'cracking' the fuel from the large-molecule octane into small molecule methanol and natural gas. This yields far more 'dynamic' explosions than 'heat' energy in the piston.

"Most people who tinker with increasing the efficiency of carburetor systems think that it is the vaporizing of the fuel that is the primary cause of the increased efficiency." Actually, following a basic law of physics, the vapor is quickly turned back to liquid by its compression in the piston. "The methanol and natural gas that are created while the fuel is vaporized are what result in the increased efficiency."

According to McBurney, the process is really quite simple. You vaporize the fuel through any of a number of methods, then in the presence of heat generated from the exhaust, and added water vapor, run the fuel-water mixture across a catalyzing agent, and a vast portion of the fuel molecules will break down into methanol and natural gas. The heat and catalyst and water drive the reaction.

Gallon for gallon, natural gas and methanol burn approximately as efficiently as gasoline. The efficiency of McBurney's system comes because by using this process of 'cracking' the fuel, one gallon of gas with two gallons of water will produce four to five Gallons of natural gas and methanol. These smaller molecules occupy a greater amount of space.

"The chemistry is straightforward, and proven," says McBurney. He verified this process at Brock University in Ontario using UV spectrum analysis and gas chromatography.

The boiling point of gasoline is in the range of 130 to 430 degrees Fahrenheit. In any given gasoline solution some molecules will boil at a lower temperature, while others boil at a higher temperature. It is a function of the chemical chain, whether it is a C-6 or up to a C-12, and each of these has a 3-D pattern that effects its boiling point, so there is an infinite variety of temperatures involved within that range.
McBurney then points out that by converting all these larger molecules of an infinite number of boiling points into mostly single-carbon molecules -- methanol and methane -- the boiling points are greatly lowered, and they come within the same temperature range, so their ignition in the piston is virtually instantaneous, giving a much greater percussion. Both the lowering of the boiling point and the synchronizing of the boiling point are what give these systems their drastically increased efficiency. It's like soldiers marching lock-step across a bridge and bringing it down.

He claims the oil industry has known of this phenomenon for decades, and has purposely thwarted this effect by its additives, especially lead, which have the effect of inhibiting this catalytic cracking process. Even "unleaded" gas includes a form of lead, according to the MSDA spec sheets that the fuel companies are required to produce.

"I don't think it is mere coincidence that the oil companies began adding lead to their gas in the 1930's after the emergence of the Pogue carburetor." Lead inhibits the catalytic property of the Pogue, rendering it nearly useless after just a short while of running.

Another additive that inhibits the catalytic cracking is an "anti pyrosis agent" that is purported to "block the natural decomposition of organic matter, so the fuel stays fresh in fuel tanks."

McBurney points out that gasoline is "organic matter," and claims that the catalytic cracking process is what the oil companies are primarily aiming to inhibit.

"Many who experiment with fuel vaporizing methods are puzzled as to why their system works well at first, but then diminishes in performance. Whatever metal is serving as the catalyst to crack to fuel is becoming caked with the additives."

McBurney proposes three different methods to overcome the additive obstacle. Gasoline obtained from the well head, straight from the refiners, before the additives are introduced, is an obvious but not readily available solution. Another alternative is to run the fuel through an activated coconut charcoal that removes the additives before vaporization. The third alternative is to increase the catalyst area a thousand times that of the Pogue, by using a bed of metal filings.

McBurney cites several substances that function as a catalyzing agent for cracking, including nickel, platinum, steel, aircraft aluminum. He used metal shavings because of the increased surface area.

After having a patent ready to file in Canada, McBurney was impeded by a change of filing protocol midstream, leading to a violation that would have been irrelevant under the previous rules. Lacking the funds to take the case to the Canadian Supreme Court, he chose instead to publish his design openly. His booklet, The Secret Super High Mileage Report, includes the patent, with drawings and explanation. He has money-back guarantee if the reader is not convinced, and has sold 1600 books with only two refunds thus far. The text is available for free on his website HIMACResearch.com

The problem with his design is that it is expensive and complex to build. It is not something someone could simply pull together in their back yard using off-the-shelf components and fit under the hood. Only mass production would render it cost effective. Better yet, the most obvious place for its integration would be into the overall design of the engine by the automobile manufacturers.
For Now . . .
Meanwhile, the most cost-effective and easy to install system McBurney recommends is the "Condensator," which retails at around $100.00. "It increases gas mileage a little, but cuts down on pollution a lot." "The older the car, the better the gas mileage improvement will be," he says. "It just hooks up in series with the hose coming from the PVC valve under the carburetor."

He recommends to be sure to empty out the canister when it reaches half full, and clean out the catalyst unit with every oil change.

For those who are only slightly mechanically inclined, he recommends the Hydrogen Boost system, and provides a manual for sale on his site that has full instructions on how to build one. It does not require welding or machine work, but just simple electrical and plumbing hook-up. It is an electrolysis unit that hooks up to the car battery. The package also includes basic plans for a home made version of the condensator.

For those who are much more mechanically inclined, he recommends the latest HIMAC publication on a CD: The APOD Fuel System, by Anthony P. O' Donnel from Australia. It comes with interactive Auto CAD 2000 drawings and complete collection of notes, testimonials, pictures, and text to help you build your own system to triple your gas mileage. More CDs are also in the works.
Like the light bulb manufacturers who purposely design a limited lifetime for their product so they can get the return business of a replacement, "the automobile manufacturers have a vested interest in inefficient carburetors, both in terms of service calls from engine wear, and in replacements," not to mention whatever collusion they have behind closed doors with the oil companies.

Efficiency means cooler running, and cooler running means longer life and less maintenance.

Until such technology is finally adopted by the automobile manufacturers, "the biggest factor that would open up this technology would be to make non-additive gasoline readily available," says McBurney. Either of those eventualities are dependent on enough people putting pressure on the oil industry and automobile industry.

In 1987 McBurney converted a '76 Dodge minivan to his design, and it got 70 mpg "when it was working well." He said the carburetor system will have to be computer controlled to handle the intricate system. "It's like an onboard oil refinery."

In similar designs, the radiator never gets hotter than lukewarm, because the fuel was being burned so efficiently. McBurney's design calls for a computer to be programmed to jettison a stream of normal fuel for initial warm up and for high acceleration so that the car will have adequate power, but that otherwise the fuel will run through the catalytic cracking unit.

Considering the wide range of boiling points of gasoline, McBurney explains why some high-efficiency carburetor claims can be misleading. "The acidic additives are catalyzing the release of a certain range of molecules in the gasoline mixture, giving an initial positive result, but then the remaining molecules are yet in solution, and the complete burn of the entire gasoline solution may not be that much more efficient." A test to ferret out this effect would be use up the whole tank of gas (however full it is) and then check the mileage.

McBurney also states that one of the factors that most carburetor efficiency enthusiasts do not realize is the importance of water in the equation. "That is why these vaporizer systems run more efficiently in humid conditions," he said. McBurney sets forth the chemical equation of the reaction, and shows that there are two water molecules called for every one molecule of gasoline, to yield C1H4 (methane/natural gas) and C1OH3 (methanol).

A contention that McBurney hears frequently when he states that methanol and natural gas are produced in the cracking of the gasoline, is that natural gas cars don't have any power. His response is that the vehicles on the market lack an accelerator (pump)/circuit. The National Hot Rodder's Association have race cars that use natural gas with an accelerator pump, and they get plenty of horse power.

One has to wonder why such a solution would not be implemented immediately into the mainstream market, if was so simple.

"It's not chemistry, it's politics," is what E.A. Cherniak, late Head of the Chemistry Department at Brock University in Ontario of told McBurney after receiving a phone call that turned him pale and scared him away from helping McBurney in 1987. Two years later he agreed to at least pen some kind of statement of endorsement, "but it is nothing compared to what he knew" laments McBurney. Professor Cherniak only went so far as to say, "The concepts of Mr. McBurney are scientifically and technologically sound."

Once at an automobile show, where McBurney was passing out business cards with a little blurb about the carburetor system, he ran into a fellow who said, "You only get 100 mpg? I get 140." They spoke at length, and when McBurney asked him why he doesn't try to do something with his technology, the man responded, looking down at his five-year-old son, that he does not want to go to jail.

McBurney tells a story of another man he met named Stanley Meyers, who said he could run a car on water, and finally got a grant for 50 million dollars to develop it, held a celebration with his colleagues at a restaurant, stood up and said, "I've been poisoned," then went out to the parking lot and keeled over dead. Meanwhile, a van had pulled up to his shop, and men wearing black carted off with his stuff. Later, someone sent McBurney a copy of all of Meyers' notes. "I didn't understand them, but I made copies of them and gave them to a lot of people. They're posted on Keeley.Net."

Threats and opposition do not stop McBurney. He has lost his wife over this, and his family has been broken up. Yet he continues to hope that some day something will happen to finally allow this technology to break into the mainstream.

Stories like this sound like so much science fiction, yet in the many time he has presented this information to an audience of at least 50, McBurney has inevitably found another person who knows someone personally who has had a super-oppression experience of some kind or another when they had developed a super efficient technology.

McBurney has tried to get on Art Bell's Coast to Coast program, but was declined by the manager who said, "Everyone knows that high efficiency carburetors are suppressed; that is not news." Yet the show regularly airs other topics that are suppressed such as UFOs, alternative healing modalities, and supernatural phenomenon. Art Bell himself responded by saying that he was not convinced there was anything to the claim, and until he rode 200 miles he would not do a show on it. Yet he regularly airs claims about other subjects of which he has no direct experience. "Perhaps I just need to find the right connection," McBurney says.

He is not lacking in his ability to express himself clearly and convincingly. "I can explain it so your mother-in-law and understand it." His presence on the phone was amiable and patient.

He also has approached Green Peace and other environmentalist groups, because of the great boon this technology would be to the environment. He offered to turn all the rights to the technology over to them so that their bylaws would not have conflict in endorsing a particular company. They likewise turned him down, saying, "We get one call a week from someone claiming they have a super-efficient carburetor," as if that was evidence that none exist.

"Not only are automobiles polluting the environment, but they are gobbling up all the oxygen on the planet," says McBurney, citing the volume of oxygen consumed by an automobile while running. Scientists have documented a distinct drop in the amount of oxygen in the air we breath over the past decades. A lack of oxygen has also been shown to be directly responsible for the increase in the incidence of cancer. That motivates McBurney perhaps more than the pollution to the environment and the consumption of non-renewable fuels. Cancer is now killing nearly one of every two people.

"I'll talk to anyone who will listen," McBurney says, whether or not they're a journalist, whether or not they're going to go build something. "I just want this technology to get out there."

He describes a metaphor. "It's like you're walking along the street and you see men raping a young girl. Do you walk on and not get involved, or do you try to do something about it? The young girl is the environment, and the men raping her are the oil interests."

"I'm doing this for my children and for the future of this planet," he says. "I don't care if I don't get a penny from it. I'll give it away. I just want to see this technology put into use."

His booklets and other information might not have the professional looking polish that is found in mainstream technologies, but it is a catalyst that can make all the difference -- if we can get the lead out.

p.s. Pass it on!!

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